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The Joy of Cooking Standard Edition: The All-Purpose Cookbook

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America's most popular kitchen bible has been revised for the first time in more than 20 years. Much is still familiar -- the recipe structure, with ingredients listed as they are called for, has been left intact, for instance -- but there's plenty that's new. Concerns about healthy eating are reflected throughout the new Joy, but old-fashioned, fat-laden dishes aren't gon America's most popular kitchen bible has been revised for the first time in more than 20 years. Much is still familiar -- the recipe structure, with ingredients listed as they are called for, has been left intact, for instance -- but there's plenty that's new. Concerns about healthy eating are reflected throughout the new Joy, but old-fashioned, fat-laden dishes aren't gone entirely -- there are still plenty of appealing recipes for pies, tarts, puddings, eggs, and meats that set cholesterol scales tipping. As in previous revisions, changing tastes in food and the widening influence of ethnic cuisines have caused the most major changes in Joy. This is the ideal book for beginners, and a great reference for experienced cooks to have on hand as well.


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America's most popular kitchen bible has been revised for the first time in more than 20 years. Much is still familiar -- the recipe structure, with ingredients listed as they are called for, has been left intact, for instance -- but there's plenty that's new. Concerns about healthy eating are reflected throughout the new Joy, but old-fashioned, fat-laden dishes aren't gon America's most popular kitchen bible has been revised for the first time in more than 20 years. Much is still familiar -- the recipe structure, with ingredients listed as they are called for, has been left intact, for instance -- but there's plenty that's new. Concerns about healthy eating are reflected throughout the new Joy, but old-fashioned, fat-laden dishes aren't gone entirely -- there are still plenty of appealing recipes for pies, tarts, puddings, eggs, and meats that set cholesterol scales tipping. As in previous revisions, changing tastes in food and the widening influence of ethnic cuisines have caused the most major changes in Joy. This is the ideal book for beginners, and a great reference for experienced cooks to have on hand as well.

30 review for The Joy of Cooking Standard Edition: The All-Purpose Cookbook

  1. 4 out of 5

    Katies_Faves

    The day I found out my grandmother was dying was the day I got this book. She was sick and we were both very hopeful that she would get better. She was lying on the couch in the living room and asked me to boil her a potato. I, being 19, had NO idea how to boil a potato! But I did not want to bother her about it - so I went into the kitchen and started up the pot of water. Not only did I ruin that cute little potato ... but I saw my grandmother lose it!! She came into the kitchen and saw the whole The day I found out my grandmother was dying was the day I got this book. She was sick and we were both very hopeful that she would get better. She was lying on the couch in the living room and asked me to boil her a potato. I, being 19, had NO idea how to boil a potato! But I did not want to bother her about it - so I went into the kitchen and started up the pot of water. Not only did I ruin that cute little potato ... but I saw my grandmother lose it!! She came into the kitchen and saw the whole potato (not peeled or cut) hanging out in the pot and lost it. She started crying... How can I leave you if you can't even boil a potato?! My grandfather happened to arrive home at that moment. He did a big sigh when he heard and saw the commotion. My poor frail grandma rolling around on the stool (too weak to stand up even), throwing pans around as she was trying to find another pot to make her potato in. He got her calmed down and fixed her another potato. But before it was even boiled she made him go out to the store "right this minute" and buy me the joy of cooking. She knew that she would not always be in the kitchen with me to help me cook -- so she got me a GREAT back up. That is how I knew my grandmother wasn't going to get better and that I had better learn how to boil a potato. I love you grandmother!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Carey

    The 1997 edition is infallible. The pre-1997 editions are good if you want to can or pickle your own veg, cook opossum, and make aspic. The fifth edition, ie the 75th Anniversary edition shown in the picture above, contains too much retro-inspired nonsense and does not continue the practical and innovative approach laid out in the 1997 edition. Basically, the 1997 edition took the heart of the Joy of Cooking, that is, that it is a book that contains all the recipes your average american cook nee The 1997 edition is infallible. The pre-1997 editions are good if you want to can or pickle your own veg, cook opossum, and make aspic. The fifth edition, ie the 75th Anniversary edition shown in the picture above, contains too much retro-inspired nonsense and does not continue the practical and innovative approach laid out in the 1997 edition. Basically, the 1997 edition took the heart of the Joy of Cooking, that is, that it is a book that contains all the recipes your average american cook needs, and updated it for the 1997 american palate (added in asian and mexican foods, , removed casseroles made with mushroom soup, etc). The first person narrative of the other editions was mostly removed. The 75th anniversary editions does no further innovation, and instead adds in some of the older recipes and sections (with limited practical use, in my opion), and adds a good bit of personal narrative back in. If you're serious about cooking, find the 1997 edition, it will never let you down. If you're interested in the evolution of american recipes from the perspective of the Becker family, the 75th anniversary edition is your book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    I would not consider this my "everyday" cookbook but the The Joy of Cooking is a definite must for anyone that takes their cooking seriously, enjoys spending a bit of time in the kitchen, and needs a good all-purpose reference that covers everything from emergency substitutions to complete banquet spreads. What do I like most about The Joy of Cooking? It is fairly encyclopedic, covering about as broad a range of cooking topics as it can; while most of the recipes are from the Western tradition, i I would not consider this my "everyday" cookbook but the The Joy of Cooking is a definite must for anyone that takes their cooking seriously, enjoys spending a bit of time in the kitchen, and needs a good all-purpose reference that covers everything from emergency substitutions to complete banquet spreads. What do I like most about The Joy of Cooking? It is fairly encyclopedic, covering about as broad a range of cooking topics as it can; while most of the recipes are from the Western tradition, it also dips into some less traditional preparations (e.g., ceviche). The book does not assume that you know anything about cooking -- not sure what a "dash" is? You can look up an explanation for that. What's the difference between a filet and a cutlet? It explains that, too. (HINT: they're basically synonymous.) It has a great index, is organized well, and has recipes to cover almost any occasion and varying degrees of culinary sophistication. What don't I like about The Joy of Cooking? It's encyclopedic nature can be a little intimidating sometimes. If you already have a good idea of what you want to make, there's a good chance that you'll find a great recipe; if you're looking for ideas though, the text may overwhelm you. Speaking of text -- the pictures are all illustrations. Granted, they're good illustrations but I tend to prefer photos in my cookbooks (helps me decide what to try next). One last point about The Joy of Cooking: I would recommend it to everyone except vegetarians. The book assumes an omnivore's diet so if you eschew the animals in your diet, I would estimate that greater than half of these recipes would not appeal to you.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dianne

    In their attempt to modernize the book, the authors omitted many recipes and techniques that are still relevant. Where is Sole Florentine, for heavens sake? And while not many families routinely can or freeze food as a winter survival strategy, there are still times when I would like to know how to do it - when my CSA gives me more corn than we can manage, or when local strawberries are beautiful, fresh, plentiful, and cheap. The lack of ice cream recipes is frustrating, especially given that so In their attempt to modernize the book, the authors omitted many recipes and techniques that are still relevant. Where is Sole Florentine, for heavens sake? And while not many families routinely can or freeze food as a winter survival strategy, there are still times when I would like to know how to do it - when my CSA gives me more corn than we can manage, or when local strawberries are beautiful, fresh, plentiful, and cheap. The lack of ice cream recipes is frustrating, especially given that so many manufacturers are making good quality electric powered ice cream makers. On the other hand, there are lots of new recipes that reflect the increasing influx of immigrant culture (and food!) into America. I'd say, Definitely buy this book, but don't chuck your old editions of Joy just yet. You're going to need both!

  5. 5 out of 5

    February Four

    For Christmas, I decided I was going to have Japanese strawberry shortcake (as in a sponge cake filled with strawberries and cream). I needed a basic sponge cake recipe and couldn't find one anywhere, not even in my usual high-altitude baking bible, Pie in the Sky, nor in the other book I had, The Best Recipe. It was December 24th, the only other recipe I'd found was online from New Mexico but which I did not trust (it asked me to beat the eggs until stiff, a HUGE no-no at high altitude). Almost For Christmas, I decided I was going to have Japanese strawberry shortcake (as in a sponge cake filled with strawberries and cream). I needed a basic sponge cake recipe and couldn't find one anywhere, not even in my usual high-altitude baking bible, Pie in the Sky, nor in the other book I had, The Best Recipe. It was December 24th, the only other recipe I'd found was online from New Mexico but which I did not trust (it asked me to beat the eggs until stiff, a HUGE no-no at high altitude). Almost at the end of my rope, it suddenly occurred to me to try this book. And I found it: High-altitude Sponge Cake, on page 750! I now have a beautiful Japanese strawberry shortcake in the fridge chilling until dinner. Christmas Eve is saved, thanks to Joy of Cooking!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kat

    No pictures, but everything in this cookbook is delicious.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    I don't know why it took so long for me to include this very worthy book to my Goodreads Library. This is my second copy. The first, a paperback, became so tattered and worn that my son presented this valued edition as a gift. I have been cooking for more than forty years, but continue to return to this book for ideas, information and special recipes. On many occasions I search for new ways to prepare foods and will find the ideal formula for preparation. Frequently I will "tweak" the recipe in I don't know why it took so long for me to include this very worthy book to my Goodreads Library. This is my second copy. The first, a paperback, became so tattered and worn that my son presented this valued edition as a gift. I have been cooking for more than forty years, but continue to return to this book for ideas, information and special recipes. On many occasions I search for new ways to prepare foods and will find the ideal formula for preparation. Frequently I will "tweak" the recipe in order to please the palates of my diners, but JOY has rarely failed to please me. It is important to note here that this is far more than a recipe book. It is possible to sit down and read this hefty tome for information and sheer enjoyment. Aside from the wealth of sections for appetizers, through to a huge array of desserts, there are sections describing a multitude of food facts. One can learn about different grains, exotic fruits and vegetables and the preparation and significance of many ethnic foods. Historical and geograpical factors are also included. I would recommend this above all other cookbooks for both novice and experienced food preparers! A perfect engagement gift!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    i love this old 1973 edition rescued from my mom's basement. the writing style is awesome: you can hear them chiding you for your awkward kitchen skills. heavily uses ingredients that are out of fashion now, so that's historically interesting: lots of parsley, livers, anchovies, tarragon. the recipes are not all so daunting: some of them are forward-looking to today's minimal cooking in their simplicity and flexibility. saved me many times when my fridge was sadly understocked. also, you can cook i love this old 1973 edition rescued from my mom's basement. the writing style is awesome: you can hear them chiding you for your awkward kitchen skills. heavily uses ingredients that are out of fashion now, so that's historically interesting: lots of parsley, livers, anchovies, tarragon. the recipes are not all so daunting: some of them are forward-looking to today's minimal cooking in their simplicity and flexibility. saved me many times when my fridge was sadly understocked. also, you can cook ANYTHING with this. including bear. whale. 'possum. (although for the latter, it suggest you raise it on a diet of milk and grains for a week before boiling it. this book is not for the weak!) i actually enjoy reading this book for fun during breakfast.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kecia

    Started as a project for my church back in the 1930s here in St. Louis, The Joy of Cooking is now an American classic. It is encyclopedic in scope. If you just want to know how to boil an egg...it's in there. If a friend brings you rudabaga...there's a recipe for that, eel....there's a recipe for that, wild game...there's a recipe for that, triple layer chocolate cake...it's in there too. Want to know which wine glass to use...where to place the forks...or how to do practically anything in the k Started as a project for my church back in the 1930s here in St. Louis, The Joy of Cooking is now an American classic. It is encyclopedic in scope. If you just want to know how to boil an egg...it's in there. If a friend brings you rudabaga...there's a recipe for that, eel....there's a recipe for that, wild game...there's a recipe for that, triple layer chocolate cake...it's in there too. Want to know which wine glass to use...where to place the forks...or how to do practically anything in the kitchen...it's in there! I have a very soft spot for this book and anytime I find one at a yard sale, thrift store, book fair...I buy it! The 75th edition has too much baking soda in the pancakes so use previous editions for that recipe. A friend of mine read the tuna salad recipe wrong - instead of using mayo OR olive oil, he read mayo AND olive oil - and it is super delicious the wrong way too. The brownie recipe is the best anywhere and even I can make them. If you only own one cookbook, this is the one to own.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    Goodness gracious, this book could be called "The Kitchen Bible". It has contains information on anything and everything you could ever want to know about preparing food. I don't understand how anyone can possibly know this much (I think writing this book would be more difficult than writing a dictionary) but I'm sure glad that they do!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Val

    Been hip to this book and have used it here and there ( I don't really cook all that much), but last night I made a mac and cheese for a large family dinner, and that shit was flame so I decided to shout them out.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Corban Ford

    I enjoyed flipping through this, and I made a pretty good dinner ALL BY MYSELF. (what an achievement right?) The Joy of Cooking just has so much depth to it, with hundreds of recipes, add ons, possible amendments, and very interesting segments on cuts of meat, best way to use grains, and well thought-out menus. it's the OG of cookbooks for a reason, and in my eyes the best cookbook of all time.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Manik Sukoco

    I'll start with the written content: this cookbook is a complete guide not just for cooking, but for food as a whole. There are recipes for every conceivable type of consumable. Beverages (nonalcoholic and alcoholic), appetizers, snacks, candies, jellies, desserts, sauces/toppings, stuffings, and what goes in-between: simple entrees to full-blown multi-course dinners. The instructions are detailed and easy to understand. Unlike cookbooks that tell you to "cut into fillets and braise until done" I'll start with the written content: this cookbook is a complete guide not just for cooking, but for food as a whole. There are recipes for every conceivable type of consumable. Beverages (nonalcoholic and alcoholic), appetizers, snacks, candies, jellies, desserts, sauces/toppings, stuffings, and what goes in-between: simple entrees to full-blown multi-course dinners. The instructions are detailed and easy to understand. Unlike cookbooks that tell you to "cut into fillets and braise until done" or "serve with a piquant sauce," the directions take you through step-by-step, always explaining what is really meant. The ingredients range from items found in any supermarket to the more obscure near-alien things that will require serious searching, although most of the ingredients are quite reasonable. There are numerous illustrations throughout, finally letting mankind in on the secret of why some coffee cakes look like they were made from the inside out. Not just recipes, either. This book includes detailed information on selecting, testing for/maintaining freshness, storing (including an entire chapter on freezing), preparing, and cutting the food. Different types of fruit are explained. Half a dozen pages are devoted to informing the reader about wine. Cuts of beef are explained here; it finally explains why chuck is chuck and tip is tip, and where they come from. Table decor, place settings, and appropriate wine glasses are explained too. The writing style is joyful. Clearly, the authors do not just enjoy cooking, serving, and eating the food... they like talking about it, too. There is a gleeful sense of humor throughout, and anecdotes about where the food originated from and how it got its preposterous name. The contents of this cookbook are a treasure. Now for the bad part: the physical book. Had the pages been printed on better quality paper, I would upgrade this poor excuse for a tome to galley status. The paper is clearly manga paper, almost (but not quite) as good as the quality of the phone book paper of your yellow pages, yet not quite as thick. The pages are transparent enough that you do not need to turn the flimsy page to see what is printed on the other side. The text size is small, the same size as the print of the listings in a phone book. The ink quality is atrocious; it's obvious that the photocopying machine used to crank out these pages was running out of toner, giving the book dark-text pages and fuzzy pale-text pages. Sometimes it's hard to tell whether the text is in bold print or if the toner cartridge went into its final death throe. The spiral spine is cheap plastic and does not allow easy page-turning. The quality of this (physical) book is absolutely ridiculous.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jonspillers

    My parents bought me my first copy of Joy in 1998. Somewhere along the line I broke its back so I recently purchased a new copy. I expect that tells you how much I value this cookbook. It is far from the only cookbook in our home, but it gets used more than any other. I have seen other editions and while they have their following, I prefer this one. From Chicken Fried Steak to Crispy Roast Duck to something called 'vegetables', 1997 Joy has what you need.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Natalie Rood

    This book is an absolute classic and for good reason. If I want to experiment with a new ingredient that's on sale at the grocery store, I can almost always find a recipe in my lovely handmedown copy of Joy of Cooking. I've been told that the 6th edition is the "definitive" one, but I'm quite fond of my 5th edition and don't feel the need to buy another.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia Nobles

    I develop lots of recipes, and when I need to know what's considered standard ingredients for a specific dish, I always turn to this book. It's a great reference source. If you never owned another cookbook, you could get along fine with just this one.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Joy

    I got this way back when I first got married. I wasn't a good cook then and I'm not now! This cookbook didn't help!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Erin *Proud Book Hoarder*

    This big, amazing book covers about everything one needs to know. Procedures, instructions, recipes, techniques, guides, food charts. This needs to be in every cooks library. Timeless information

  19. 4 out of 5

    Irene

    One of my go-to favourites in the kitchen. What I love about the 75th anniversary edition of Joy of Cooking is that it has a little bit of everything, evocative of the time period each edition was published. There are recipes for finger food and casseroles with the most 1950s names, alongside recipes for making sushi rice. It's fun to flip through the pages, learning the difference between appetizers and hors d'œuvres to the entertainment and course planning aspects of home dining. You might not One of my go-to favourites in the kitchen. What I love about the 75th anniversary edition of Joy of Cooking is that it has a little bit of everything, evocative of the time period each edition was published. There are recipes for finger food and casseroles with the most 1950s names, alongside recipes for making sushi rice. It's fun to flip through the pages, learning the difference between appetizers and hors d'œuvres to the entertainment and course planning aspects of home dining. You might not apply all the information right away but you'll enjoy learning about it! Joy of Cooking offers uncomplicated but reliable recipes for homemade comfort food. Roasted vegetable lasagna, shepherd's pie and their potato recipes in general (mashed, scallop, bubble and squeak) were so easy to make and so cheap to make. There were so many leftovers. Generally, I've been more impressed by their savory section but will need to explore baking further. I tried their banana bread recipe but thought it tasted dry, although others who tasted it said it was fine. Joy of Cooking is a valuable encyclopedic resource for your basic North American classics.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lisa (Harmonybites)

    If you look on GoodReads under "Popular Cookbooks Books" (sic) the Joy of Cooking is right at the top. It's reputably the go to cookbook, a "teaching" cookbook for those who don't just burn toast, they're capable of burning water. I'm not that bad, but neither am I a gourmet---I could use some teaching. I've long coveted this doorstopper book of 1,132 pages containing 4,500 recipes and finally broke down and ordered it when I had a Barnes and Noble coupon. It's like an encyclopedia of cooking. It If you look on GoodReads under "Popular Cookbooks Books" (sic) the Joy of Cooking is right at the top. It's reputably the go to cookbook, a "teaching" cookbook for those who don't just burn toast, they're capable of burning water. I'm not that bad, but neither am I a gourmet---I could use some teaching. I've long coveted this doorstopper book of 1,132 pages containing 4,500 recipes and finally broke down and ordered it when I had a Barnes and Noble coupon. It's like an encyclopedia of cooking. It took some getting used to. The recipes aren't organized in the manner I've come to expect. Take, for instance, the beginning of the recipe for Chili Con Carne on page 513: Pat dry: 3 pounds boneless beef chuck, trimmed and cut into 1/2-inch cubes Season with: 1 to 2 teaspoons salt Heat in a large skillet over medium-high heat: 2 tablespoons olive oil And so on. Do you see what I mean? I'm used to recipes that list all the ingredients at the top, with instructions separate beneath. It was so different than how I'd done things for decades it was hard to adjust initially, although its ways have grown on me. Worth the price alone just for the sections after recipes such as "Keeping and Storing Food," "Know Your Ingredients" and "Cooking Methods and Techniques."

  21. 4 out of 5

    The Pirate Ghost (Formerly known as the Curmudgeon)

    I grew up with this cook book. The version I learned to cook from and came to love was given to my mother as a wedding gift to my mother. Thanks to my mother's help, I believe that should be the 1951 version as seen here. This book has a recipe for just about anything you might want to cook, and several things that you might not. Having said that, if it's not in the book, it might not be worth cooking. Not only are there 1000's of recipes, there is good gouge on substitutes, sauces, dips, how to I grew up with this cook book. The version I learned to cook from and came to love was given to my mother as a wedding gift to my mother. Thanks to my mother's help, I believe that should be the 1951 version as seen here. This book has a recipe for just about anything you might want to cook, and several things that you might not. Having said that, if it's not in the book, it might not be worth cooking. Not only are there 1000's of recipes, there is good gouge on substitutes, sauces, dips, how to do's and conversions of measurement relative to cooking. It could be the greatest cook book ever! (though I may have had my hands on an older edition, the 1975 edition was the most popular of all of them.) The original edition was published in 1931 with a forward by Irma S. Rombauer as a self-pub. Since then, it's gone through many revisions, some authorized and some that came after Rombauer passed away at the age of 85 in 1962. The most successful (as measured by sales) was the 1975 edition, the last edition published with Rombauer's approval was in 1962 and the last edition published at all came in 2006 as a 75th anniversary edition. (8 actual editions, plus a handful of reprinting). This is the cook book any chef wants on the shelf.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Laura Zimmerman

    Over the years I have collected many cookbooks. Some for the recipes, some for the photos, some for the trial-and-error variations on different recipes...cookbooks are appealing to me for lots of reasons. However, despite my sagging shelves full of cookbooks, I didn't have a copy of The Joy of Cooking. Compared to others, from afar it seemed...kind of dry, I thought. No great photography, no glossy pages, no celebrity chefs' photos on the front (I will say that I've never bought a cookbook just Over the years I have collected many cookbooks. Some for the recipes, some for the photos, some for the trial-and-error variations on different recipes...cookbooks are appealing to me for lots of reasons. However, despite my sagging shelves full of cookbooks, I didn't have a copy of The Joy of Cooking. Compared to others, from afar it seemed...kind of dry, I thought. No great photography, no glossy pages, no celebrity chefs' photos on the front (I will say that I've never bought a cookbook just because it was written by a celebrity chef). It was just simple, black and white, and LOTS of recipes. Imagine my surprise when I received The Joy of Cooking as a gift and I realized how wrong I was. As I glanced through it for the first time I was awed by how comprehensive yet simple the book is. The recipes are well laid out, the instructions are clear and complete, and every recipe I've tried from the book has been spot-on. The authors went to a great deal of effort to make the book user-friendly, informative, and unintimidating. It's easy to see why The Joy of Cooking has become a part of so many kitchens for so many years. I just wish I had discovered this book much earlier in my cooking years--it would have saved me a lot of money spent on other cookbooks.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Wendy, Lady Evelyn Quince

    Simply put: My cooking Bible. I could not live without it. From drinks, to appetizers, to brunch, to soups, to tasty vegetable dishes, to meat courses, to fish, to desserts...this is it! I've learned to prepare rabbits and squirrel, made spaetzle and dumplings, elegant desserts like pears soaked in wine and cream...and so many more! Not bad for a woman whose first prepared meal was overcooked linguini (20 minutes in a pot) and canned, cold clam sauce. :-0 5 stars /A++++++++++

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Vegan

    My mother used this, among many other cookbooks. I've never used it much. But it's very useful as a reference to determine the correct cooking times for different methods of cooking many different vegetables.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Laurie Stoll

    Although this book is FILLED with recipes, it was always one of the last I would look through for recipes.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Toviel

    Technically DNF. Not for lack of want, but for lack of time. It's been on my "currently reading" list for 3+ years, and I haven't touched even a quarter of the recipes inside. Of what I did make (mostly eggs, cookies, and a handful of miscellaneous items), JOY OF COOKING is a solid introduction to home cooking for people who can't boil an egg to save their lives. Some of the recipes are peak Bland White People Cooking, the sort of stuff that lives only at questionable potluck dinners and school Technically DNF. Not for lack of want, but for lack of time. It's been on my "currently reading" list for 3+ years, and I haven't touched even a quarter of the recipes inside. Of what I did make (mostly eggs, cookies, and a handful of miscellaneous items), JOY OF COOKING is a solid introduction to home cooking for people who can't boil an egg to save their lives. Some of the recipes are peak Bland White People Cooking, the sort of stuff that lives only at questionable potluck dinners and school bake sales. Definitely worth looking through the explanations of why certain foods are cooked a certain way, for both seasoned chefs to kitchen newbies. The cookies are pretty horrific though, ngl.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    I took my time reading this cook book, but I found it a pleasant read and was educational. Nice basic cookbook.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Gibby

    Your mouth will be watering at the sight of this scrumpush and beautiful book. The taste will remind you of a simpler time in american history. Food buffs alike will enjoy the slight but powerful tones of characterization and plot. The setting is recherché, Congenial & Honorable. The decor is far from deplorable and fallacious. You will truly love my amazing this amazing cooking book.

  29. 5 out of 5

    rkosurvivor

    I didn't realize this was an actual cookbook whoops

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Richardson

    I’m marking this as ‘read’ because this book has been my go to for many years. Some of my favorite stand by recipes and lots of great basic and advanced cooking advice.

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