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The Unofficial Harry Potter Cookbook: From Cauldron Cakes to Knickerbocker Glory--More Than 150 Magical Recipes for Wizards and Non-Wizards Alike

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Bangers and mash with Harry, Ron, and Hermione in the Hogwarts dining hall. A proper cuppa tea and rock cakes in Hagrid's hut. Cauldron cakes and pumpkin juice on the Hogwarts Express. With this cookbook, dining a la Hogwarts is as easy as Banoffi Pie! With more than 150 easy-to-make recipes, tips, and techniques, you can indulge in spellbindingly delicious meals drawn str Bangers and mash with Harry, Ron, and Hermione in the Hogwarts dining hall. A proper cuppa tea and rock cakes in Hagrid's hut. Cauldron cakes and pumpkin juice on the Hogwarts Express. With this cookbook, dining a la Hogwarts is as easy as Banoffi Pie! With more than 150 easy-to-make recipes, tips, and techniques, you can indulge in spellbindingly delicious meals drawn straight from the pages of your favorite Potter stories, such as:Treacle Tart--Harry's favorite dessert, Molly's Meat Pies--Mrs. Weasley's classic dish, Kreacher's French Onion Soup, Pumpkin Pasties--a staple on the Hogwarts Express cartWith a dash of magic and a drop of creativity, you'll conjure up the entries, desserts, snacks, and drinks you need to transform ordinary Muggle meals into magickal culinary masterpieces, sure make even Mrs. Weasley proud!


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Bangers and mash with Harry, Ron, and Hermione in the Hogwarts dining hall. A proper cuppa tea and rock cakes in Hagrid's hut. Cauldron cakes and pumpkin juice on the Hogwarts Express. With this cookbook, dining a la Hogwarts is as easy as Banoffi Pie! With more than 150 easy-to-make recipes, tips, and techniques, you can indulge in spellbindingly delicious meals drawn str Bangers and mash with Harry, Ron, and Hermione in the Hogwarts dining hall. A proper cuppa tea and rock cakes in Hagrid's hut. Cauldron cakes and pumpkin juice on the Hogwarts Express. With this cookbook, dining a la Hogwarts is as easy as Banoffi Pie! With more than 150 easy-to-make recipes, tips, and techniques, you can indulge in spellbindingly delicious meals drawn straight from the pages of your favorite Potter stories, such as:Treacle Tart--Harry's favorite dessert, Molly's Meat Pies--Mrs. Weasley's classic dish, Kreacher's French Onion Soup, Pumpkin Pasties--a staple on the Hogwarts Express cartWith a dash of magic and a drop of creativity, you'll conjure up the entries, desserts, snacks, and drinks you need to transform ordinary Muggle meals into magickal culinary masterpieces, sure make even Mrs. Weasley proud!

30 review for The Unofficial Harry Potter Cookbook: From Cauldron Cakes to Knickerbocker Glory--More Than 150 Magical Recipes for Wizards and Non-Wizards Alike

  1. 4 out of 5

    Miranda Reads

    Honestly, one of my favorite books ever. Dinah Bucholz, a huge Harry Potter fan and food lover, has always been interested in what the characters are eating. So much of Hogwarts's magic revolves around food - from the Great Hall tables to home-cooked recipes a la Mrs. Weasley's wandwork. And yet, where does one go if they want to try Hagrid's rock cakes or Mrs. Weasley's muffins? What the heck is treacle?? The answer has finally come. Bucholz went through the entire series and found all of the Honestly, one of my favorite books ever. Dinah Bucholz, a huge Harry Potter fan and food lover, has always been interested in what the characters are eating. So much of Hogwarts's magic revolves around food - from the Great Hall tables to home-cooked recipes a la Mrs. Weasley's wandwork. And yet, where does one go if they want to try Hagrid's rock cakes or Mrs. Weasley's muffins? What the heck is treacle?? The answer has finally come. Bucholz went through the entire series and found all of the food references by Harry and the gang, then found traditional recipes according to the time era and the country of origin - and packaged it all in this wondrous little book. Each recipe is accompanied with a little quote, page number and blurb about where the item originated. The recipes are well laid out and easy to follow, with helpful hints for the more difficult ones! In short - I freaking love it. Since reading this book, I've kindled a huge passion for cooking and baking . I've found excuses to try recipes out on anyone and everyone I know. So many recipes within Harry Potter are normal, everyday items in England and, like Bulchoz, always wondered what does the food taste like? Is spotted dick gross? It's not! Does Hagrid's Rock Cakes actually contain rocks? They don't! And what in the world is black pudding? It's better not to know... I've paged through this book so many times that I've memorized the recipe locations. Here are some easy, personal favorites: Breakfasts Hagrid's rock cakes (finally figured out scones. So many toppings and varieties at my fingertips) Breakfast Before Class: herbed and spiced sausage patties Treats from the Train's cauldron cakes Mrs Weasley's oversized blueberry muffins (below) Meals Aunt Petunia's pork tenderloin (either the regular or the bourbon glaze) Molly Weasley's onion meatballs with onion sauce All of the savory pies (except for the kidney and pork ones, haven't made those yet) Desserts Molly Weasley's apple pie (quote from co-worker: "Miranda, you make some bomb-a** pie") Hagrid's sugar biscuits (great for cut out cookies) Molly Weasley's Vol-a-vents (huge hit for mother's day breakfast) Blog | Instagram | Twitter

  2. 4 out of 5

    Darth J

    So I saw this cauldron soup mug and it reminded me that I read this book and never added a review. There really doesn't seem like anything too fancy here, so people with a Sim cooking skill of 3 bars or less shouldn't feel out of place picking this up. Happy eating :-)

  3. 5 out of 5

    Gabriel Vidrine

    Okay, so being one of the few people who actually has cooked out of this recipe book, I wanted to say a few things about it. Real cooking takes some effort, people. Real cooking isn't about throwing three ingredients into the microwave and hoping it doesn't taste like rubber when it comes out. These recipes are the REAL DEAL. Real cooking, real home cooking. So it will take some effort. Some of the recipes are great. I totally enjoyed the Yorkshire pudding with our roast (we did pork since I don't Okay, so being one of the few people who actually has cooked out of this recipe book, I wanted to say a few things about it. Real cooking takes some effort, people. Real cooking isn't about throwing three ingredients into the microwave and hoping it doesn't taste like rubber when it comes out. These recipes are the REAL DEAL. Real cooking, real home cooking. So it will take some effort. Some of the recipes are great. I totally enjoyed the Yorkshire pudding with our roast (we did pork since I don't eat beef; otherwise the recipe was exactly the same). My husband loved the treacle tart, but it wasn't my thing...but it was a good recipe. I also made the English Strawberry Trifle, which was very complicated but worth every moment of sweating in the kitchen. You can't get that type of food from a box. The Shepherd's Pie was also quite tasty (and relatively simple). However, some of the recipes leave something to be desired. I agree with other reviewers. Really, a recipe for eggs and bacon? I think most people who are capable of cooking the rest of the recipes in this book know how to cook bacon and eggs. The sugar-mice are just fondant? Who wants to eat just plain-old fondant? Why not add some flavoring (I don't count vanilla extract) and then roll the mice in sugar to make...SUGAR mice? And then there was the Old-Fashioned Chocolate Buttermilk Sheet Cake Disaster. I was surprised at how liquid-y the batter was, and even more surprised that it only called for a 9x13 pan. Thinking that this cake probably wouldn't rise so much, I went ahead and used all the batter in one pan. Disaster. Complete, utter, total disaster. I followed the recipe to a tee and what happened? The batter bubbled up all over my oven, and continued to bubble and spill everywhere even after I removed it from the oven. All those ingredients, wasted. Smoke everywhere. Did the author even test this recipe? This should have been for two pans, or perhaps four round pans. DO NOT try to bake this in only one 9x13 pan, unless you want to waste the rest of the batter. Now I'm afraid to try the rest of the recipes, wondering what other disasters await me.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jess ❈Harbinger of Blood-Soaked Rainbows❈

    A belated birthday gift from my beautiful friend Carrie! The perfect gift for a chronic bookaholic and foodie. Can't wait to try some of these recipes! UPDATE 2/8/15 I made my first official Harry Potter recipe this morning. Here is my giant stack of cauldron cakes. Light, fluffy, crepe-like pancakes with a hint of lemon zest. I ate them with lemon curd and aussie-style yogurt. Delish!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Manybooks

    While the blurbs paraphrasing episodes from J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter series have generally been entertaining enough (although also often much too repetitive in scope and feel, and to such an extent that I actually ended up skimming quite a large chunk of the second part of The Unofficial Harry Potter Cookbook as far too many of the presented examples of Harry and his friends enjoying different types of foods actually just ended up feeling as though one was reading the same types of scenarios While the blurbs paraphrasing episodes from J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter series have generally been entertaining enough (although also often much too repetitive in scope and feel, and to such an extent that I actually ended up skimming quite a large chunk of the second part of The Unofficial Harry Potter Cookbook as far too many of the presented examples of Harry and his friends enjoying different types of foods actually just ended up feeling as though one was reading the same types of scenarios over and over again), I cannot really say that I have at ALL appreciated the manner in which author Dinah Bucholz has approached her 150 odd recipes. For since all of the recipes featured in The Unofficial Harry Potter Cookbook are of course and naturally United Kingdom based and that a goodly number of them also do appear as being potentially rather difficult and complicated to make, with intricate instructions as well as sometimes necessitating ingredients with which many American and/or Canadian cooks might be not that familiar, I for one would have assumed that Dinah Bucholz to also the include at least a SOME pictures, some accompanying photos of what the end products would and should look like (and that there are NO accompanying visuals whatsoever featured and presented in The Unofficial Harry Potter Cookbook, this really does make me quite massively and personally livid). And indeed (and even though I do like and very much appreciate that Dinah Bucholz has listed her sources at the back of The Unofficial Harry Potter Cookbook), the complete lack of any and all photographs (or illustrations) is definitely enough this time around for me to only consider but a one star ranking for this here cookbook, mostly because there is no way that I even want to try to make many if not most of the author's featured recipes without a bit of a visual guide, as I am not that great of a cook and absolutely do require pictures of at the very least the finished, the end products, especially with the kind of often quite complicated and difficult to make recipes to be found in the Unofficial Harry Potter Cookbook, and in particular, the different kinds of ice creams, candies and the like in my opinion absolutely do need to be visualised as illustrations or photographs. And I really do have to question why Dinah Bucholz ended up deciding to not present any food based pictures period in The Unofficial Harry Potter Cookbook, as even the book cover does not really feature food, but just a cauldron (in which, I guess, food might be cooked, but considering that this is a Harry Potter cookbook, the cauldron probably simply relates back to the fact that Hogwarts is a school of sorcery).

  6. 5 out of 5

    Gina

    I don't even know where to begin with this book! It is amazing. You think you're just getting another book with recipes, but no, it is so much more than that. Even the paper it is printed on is amazing. I received this book as a gift from my son, who knows how much of a Potterhead I am. For that alone I would treasure it, but it goes beyond that. It is, essentially, a work of art in and of itself. The recipes, some of which are old English traditions, are also tied in with the Potter series. The b I don't even know where to begin with this book! It is amazing. You think you're just getting another book with recipes, but no, it is so much more than that. Even the paper it is printed on is amazing. I received this book as a gift from my son, who knows how much of a Potterhead I am. For that alone I would treasure it, but it goes beyond that. It is, essentially, a work of art in and of itself. The recipes, some of which are old English traditions, are also tied in with the Potter series. The book includes where the students or other characters enjoyed the particular dish. Not all of the foods are necessarily enjoyed at the great feasts at Hogwarts; some are just mentioned in passing. For example the recipe for Lemon Drops refers back to a conversation Harry had with Professor McGonagall, and "lemon drop" is also the password to Harry's personal quarters (there's some trivia for you!). This isn't a normal cookbook. It isn't normal in any sense of the word. It's a treasure.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Aoife

    OK, so I haven't yet tried out any of the recipes, so I won't rate it yet, but just from reading it there are some things I noticed:   A recipe for Bacon and Eggs? Really? Actually it's two recepies for Bacon and Eggs and then another for bacon. Has anybody ever needed instructions on how to make bacon? The way the recepies are sorted is less-than-ideal. There's a chapter for the food Harry had with the Dursley's, another for the Weasley's, the Hogwarts. So for every chapter you get proper dinner, OK, so I haven't yet tried out any of the recipes, so I won't rate it yet, but just from reading it there are some things I noticed:   A recipe for Bacon and Eggs? Really? Actually it's two recepies for Bacon and Eggs and then another for bacon. Has anybody ever needed instructions on how to make bacon? The way the recepies are sorted is less-than-ideal. There's a chapter for the food Harry had with the Dursley's, another for the Weasley's, the Hogwarts. So for every chapter you get proper dinner, cakes, sweets, desserts etc. Now if they would at least fit together, so that all the dinners mentioned in the Weasley-chapters would go particularily well with the desserts but you can just about combine everything with everything else. Sorting them differently would have made more sense. A LOT of space is used for the quotes mentioning the food and then telling more about that scene in great detail. You know, I've read the Harry Potter books. More than once. I've watched the movies. I'm quite familiar with the stories...as I assume are most people reading this book. We don't need to be told that Harry is best friends with Ron. These parts could have been shorter. This book seems to be targeted at children (there are several references to 'your friends' and 'your parents') but apart from the Bacon and Eggs most recepies look bloody complicated. There are a lot of pasties (I have made pasties several times and still don't get the dough right...) and instructions like 'Let cook for and hour but be careful, don't let it get to hot as it might explode'. Probably not the ideal choice for 13 year old HP-fans. Now I'm not saying it shouldn't have these recipes but some kind of rating system from 'Children can make this on their own with some supervision from adults' to 'children can watch adults from a safe distance while they try not to blow the kitchen up while cooking' would have been a good idea. Two recipes are actually marked as 'not tested, try at your own risk'. Now I don't think I need to say anything except WTF?

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nikki Poulos

    Yummy food inspired from the Potter-verse 10/10 recommend

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

    Such a fun book! I always forget I have this and haven't used it nearly enough! Must remedy that soon. We've only tried one recipe out of it (made it twice) and it was really good! MOLLY’S MEATBALLS WITH ONION SAUCE

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ivonne Rovira

    I thoroughly enjoyed Dinah Bucholtz’s The Unofficial Harry Potter Cookbook: From Cauldron Cakes to Knickerbocker Glory — More Than 150 Magical Recipes for Muggles and Wizards. But I was a bit confused as to who the intended audience was. Initially, I thought it was a cookbook aimed at children. The introduction seems to make it seem so, and I thought, what a great idea! Lure boys and girls into the joys of cooking by exploiting — er, capitalizing — on children’s love for the Harry Potter books a I thoroughly enjoyed Dinah Bucholtz’s The Unofficial Harry Potter Cookbook: From Cauldron Cakes to Knickerbocker Glory — More Than 150 Magical Recipes for Muggles and Wizards. But I was a bit confused as to who the intended audience was. Initially, I thought it was a cookbook aimed at children. The introduction seems to make it seem so, and I thought, what a great idea! Lure boys and girls into the joys of cooking by exploiting — er, capitalizing — on children’s love for the Harry Potter books and movies. Each recipe references a dish or treat mentioned in one of the seven Harry Potter novels, complete with quotation and citation. But then I began going through the cookbook, and I would definitely hesitate before giving it to anyone younger than 13 or 14. Frying, hot ovens, lots of dicing — none of these are activities I would allow a preteen to even think about doing! My daughter ended up in the Emergency Room one night from a knife cut on her palm — and she was 14! I don’t know who was sobbing more: her or me. So, while The Unofficial Harry Potter Cookbook: From Cauldron Cakes to Knickerbocker Glory — More Than 150 Magical Recipes for Muggles and Wizards might be a good present for a mom or dad who wants to cook alongside a child, it’s no substitute for The Mom 100 Cookbook: 100 Recipes Every Mom Needs in Her Back Pocket for a parent who wants to teach a child to cook. That said, there are plenty of grown-up Potter Heads who would love this book. And it’s serviceable as a general introduction to British cookery (Chiddingly Hotpot, Toad in the Hole, roast beef and Yorkshire pudding, steak and potato pie, Scotch Collops, bangers and mash, a traditional fry-up including fried tomatoes, English strawberry trifle, Victoria sponge, or Spotted Dick anyone?) or for anyone wishing to learn more about the history of traditional English dishes, as Bucholz includes histories for nearly every single recipe. But, as the proof of the pudding is in the eating, so is the proof of a cookbook in how many recipes the reader can use. I copied down more than 40 recipes — which is great as far as I’m concerned. And, for those with a Kindle Unlimited subscription, it’s free! You can’t beat that!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kaleigh

    Now, like everyone else here I'm going to complain about the lack of pictures in this cookbook. The thing that got to me the most though, was that some recipes have not even been tested. Quote: "You may find this recipe a bit, well, repulsive. The following recipe has not been tested, so proceed at your peril (if you can even find all the ingredients)." This was a recipe for haggis and while I will certainly admit that this is not something that I think "Right, well, I can't wait to make that Tuesd Now, like everyone else here I'm going to complain about the lack of pictures in this cookbook. The thing that got to me the most though, was that some recipes have not even been tested. Quote: "You may find this recipe a bit, well, repulsive. The following recipe has not been tested, so proceed at your peril (if you can even find all the ingredients)." This was a recipe for haggis and while I will certainly admit that this is not something that I think "Right, well, I can't wait to make that Tuesday night!" because it's not something in my culture and, admittedly, it's not something I've ever tried, though I would. I'm also a little upset by the fact that the author appears to throw away the fact that this is (as she states) the signature dish of Scotland and puts it into her cookbook without even trying it, first. There is no excuse not to test recipes. And there are hundreds if not thousands of people out there who would be more than willing to test your recipes, free of charge and, often, without even asking for a credit. Personally, I feel like if you are not willing to test your own recipes it is unfair of you to put them on paper for other people to spend their money on and put their effort into when it is something you haven't even put in the effort to try yourself. I don't mean to sound rude, just practical. I don't have a lot of money for food - I mean, I really don't - and I'm not alone there, and so regardless of the author's preference (as a cookbook writer, shouldn't you enjoy all your recipes?) if I'm going to spend my money on the ingredients I need, only to put it together and find that it's a recipe that, let's just say, is not good, then I've wasted money on something that I cannot eat. The book also could have benefited from an index, especially considering that it was not laid out according to meals. The Helpful Hints were great, but are listed at the beginning and none of the recipes that I noticed ever seem to allude back to the helpful hints for things such as: "If you use glass pans such as Pyrex or dark metal pans to bake cakes, subrtact 25 degrees from the temperature supplied in the recipe as these pans get hotter..." When I'm in the kitchen, I'm not going to read every single one of the helpful hints every time I want to cook something out of this book. Complaints aside, I will say that the book is pretty and looks like a used Hogwarts textbook or something that the house elves might cook out of, assuming they'd ever need cookbooks at all, but I can't get past the fact that it's a poorly laid out cookbook with some recipes that aren't even tested - that could just be a personal issue of mine. I did really enjoy How to make a proper cuppa and other bits and bats scattered throughout. It's clear the author did research on the dishes, which is nice and always interesting - I love, love, love when cookbooks have author personality. Some recipes in here sound delicious too. Chivy cheesy eggs for one. This is a cookbook that had good potential (especially with about 20% less icecream ideas which seemed to me variations of the same formula but then - I've never made icecream), but due to lack of photographs and, above all, lack of testing, I'm only going to rate it two stars.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Angie

    To be fair ... I did actually read/skim over this cookbook WANTING to love it. And I still love the idea of it. But I didn't actually try cooking any of the recipes. There are several things in here that I would have changed. 1) No photos. No photos at all. I know that makes cookbooks cost more (and not all cookbooks have them) but for not particularly gifted cooks like myself, well. We kind of need the photos. 2) Not particularly easy looking recipes. Again ... kind of depends on what you're looki To be fair ... I did actually read/skim over this cookbook WANTING to love it. And I still love the idea of it. But I didn't actually try cooking any of the recipes. There are several things in here that I would have changed. 1) No photos. No photos at all. I know that makes cookbooks cost more (and not all cookbooks have them) but for not particularly gifted cooks like myself, well. We kind of need the photos. 2) Not particularly easy looking recipes. Again ... kind of depends on what you're looking for in a cookbook. Willing to put forth a little effort? This might be just the thing for you. Most of it was a little complicated for my tastes, much as I think it would be grand to plan an HP party. 3) The organization. For example, chapter one is titled "Good Food with Bad Relatives." All of the recipes are in some way related to Harry's experiences with the Dursleys. That puts a recipe for bacon and eggs next to a recipe for double chocolate ice cream cones--which feels odd. There is an index, so I guess that's something. Too bad they couldn't get (or maybe didn't even try) "official" status so that they could have included direct quotes. Or, again, maybe photos from the movie. I just like visual both my cookbooks and tie-in anythings.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Nichelle

    The Unofficial Harry Potter Cookbook is a collection of recipes for foods found in the Harry Potter books by J.K. Rowling. But the cookbook isn’t just a collection of recipes, it also provides the story and history behind each dish. The book pulls different kinds of food from all over every book, from ice cream, to onion soup, to sugar mice, but can also be read simply for the interesting background behind the all of them, back ground that isn’t just from Harry Potter, but the real world as well The Unofficial Harry Potter Cookbook is a collection of recipes for foods found in the Harry Potter books by J.K. Rowling. But the cookbook isn’t just a collection of recipes, it also provides the story and history behind each dish. The book pulls different kinds of food from all over every book, from ice cream, to onion soup, to sugar mice, but can also be read simply for the interesting background behind the all of them, back ground that isn’t just from Harry Potter, but the real world as well. The history of potatoes (once thought to be poisonous) were introduced as a safe food, where the word “eggnog” might have come from, and more are all contained in the book. I love this cookbook. All the recipes that I have tried have worked out perfectly, and everyone who has tasted any of the food has agreed that it is delicious. Bucholz went through a lot of recipes to find the best ones, and made sure to tweak each recipe so that it would suit the modern taste. But my absolute favorite thing would have to be the stories behind all the foods. I recommend this cookbook to anybody who wants entertainment and delicious recipes!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Includes quotes and passages from the books that inspired the recipes - though most are just traditional British foods. I couldn't believe there wasn't a recipe for butterbeer which has got to be the most popular wizarding food any Muggle would like to try, but there are many others on the net. I also like cookbooks with pictures which this doesn't have. Still a good addition to your HP library.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lolly's Library

    I admit it, I adore tie-in cookbooks. Redwall, Discworld, even Fanny Flagg's Whistle Stop Cafe cookbook...you find me a cookbook that ties in with a series I enjoy and I'll snap it up, lickety-split. That's why I was so excited to find The Unofficial Harry Potter Cookbook. Even since I first read the books, the food mentioned in them fascinated me, not just the traditional British food (which, due to my Anglophilia, I've long been interested in), but the strange and wonderful wizard food, food w I admit it, I adore tie-in cookbooks. Redwall, Discworld, even Fanny Flagg's Whistle Stop Cafe cookbook...you find me a cookbook that ties in with a series I enjoy and I'll snap it up, lickety-split. That's why I was so excited to find The Unofficial Harry Potter Cookbook. Even since I first read the books, the food mentioned in them fascinated me, not just the traditional British food (which, due to my Anglophilia, I've long been interested in), but the strange and wonderful wizard food, food which I wondered how it could be translated into real-world equivalents. It's obvious from Dinah Bucholz's writing that she, too, is fascinated by those dishes mentioned by Rowling and it's also apparent that she's given a lot of thought and put a lot of effort into creating the dishes listed in this cookbook. Each one is headed by a synopsis of the scene in which the dish appears and most have sidebars full of trivia related to the dish or the ingredients used. Tips, techniques and ways to make some of the dishes more like those in the books (especially as applies to the food served by Hagrid) appear at the end of many of the recipes. The instructions are clearly written, as they should be seeing how this is directed more towards young cooks, book and web sources are clearly listed, and the index is extensive, making it easy to find a particular dish. I haven't had the opportunity to test any of the recipes out; should I do so and meet with success, I'll be sure to add another star to my rating. Note: Due to the unofficial nature of this cookbook, being unaffiliated, licensed or endorsed by J.K. Rowling or Warner Bros., some famous recipes, most notably Butterbeer, aren't included due to their licensed state. However, a quick web search will garner you several takes on Butterbeer as well as many other Potter treats which might be missing from this book, although, considering the extensive number of recipes contained in this book (over 150), there can't be that many.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Shay

    Alright, this was a pretty fun read. There was such a huge variety of recipes to try out! There were a few that I felt were a bit redundant (Bacon and eggs??) While others were a tad more advanced. I loved how you actually got a bit of a history lesson with all the dishes. All together though I felt this really captured the palate that you would find at Hogwarts.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Missie

    Bangers and mash with Harry, Ron, and Hermione in the Hogwarts dining hall. A proper cuppa tea and rock cakes in Hagrid's hut. Cauldron cakes and pumpkin juice on the Hogwarts Express. With this cookbook, dining a la Hogwarts is as easy as Banoffi Pie! With more than 150 easy-to-make recipes, tips, and techniques, you can indulge in spellbindingly delicious meals drawn straight from the pages of your favorite Potter stories, such as: Treacle Tart--Harry's favorite dessert, Molly's Meat Pie Bangers and mash with Harry, Ron, and Hermione in the Hogwarts dining hall. A proper cuppa tea and rock cakes in Hagrid's hut. Cauldron cakes and pumpkin juice on the Hogwarts Express. With this cookbook, dining a la Hogwarts is as easy as Banoffi Pie! With more than 150 easy-to-make recipes, tips, and techniques, you can indulge in spellbindingly delicious meals drawn straight from the pages of your favorite Potter stories, such as: Treacle Tart--Harry's favorite dessert, Molly's Meat Pies--Mrs. Weasley's classic dish, Kreacher's French Onion Soup, Pumpkin Pasties--a staple on the Hogwarts Express cart With a dash of magic and a drop of creativity, you'll conjure up the entries, desserts, snacks, and drinks you need to transform ordinary Muggle meals into magickal culinary masterpieces, sure make even Mrs. Weasley proud! I thought of the Bookies Become Foodies week and was excited to make and share some creations from my favorite reads. Then, when I came to actually deciding what to make, I had nothing. Complete brain fart. So, Amazon to the rescue. I found an amazing cookbook I had to add immediately to my library. Harry Potter is my favorite series. I cannot wait to get to Universal Studios, so in the mean time, I am living a little piece of Harry Potter in my own kitchen. Rock Cakes were eaten by multiple times in the book. Hagrid loved them, although they were a lot more like rocks than cakes when Hagrid made them. The cakes appear in The Sorcerer's Stone, The Goblet of Fire and The Half Blood Prince! This recipe is found on page 53.  2 cups all-purpose flour 1/2 cup granulated sugar 1 tsp baking powder 1/2 tsp cinnamon 1/4 tsp salt 1 stick butter - cold, cut into chunks 1 large egg 1/3 cup whole milk 1 cup raisins Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F and flour a large cookie sheet. Combine the flour, sugar, baking powder, cinnamon and salt in a large mixing bowl. With your fingertips, rub the butter into the dry ingredients until the mixture reaches the consistency of wet sand. Beat the egg together with the milk and pour it into the flour-butter mixture. Fold it together using a spatula to form a stiff dough. Fold in the raisins. Drop dough by rounded tablespoonfuls 2 inches apart on the prepared cookie sheet.  Bake 25 minutes or until the bottoms are golden, rotating the pan midway through baking.  Makes 12 I am not sure why, but this Treacle Fudge recipe peeked my interest. I love fudge, the texture, the sweetness - so dreamy. With the addition of molasses, I had to try it. The note in the margin of the book stated that "some speculate that a batch of caramels came out wrong - fudged - but it seems it was invented in the United States." I have never had fudge that wasn't chocolate or peanut butter, so this was a fun new baking adventure. It looked like a lot of steps in the directions, but with my mixer, it was fairly easy. 1 cup granulated sugar 1 cup packed dark sugar 1 stick butter 1/2 cup heavy cream 2 tablespoon  black treacle or dark molasses 1/4 tsp cream of tartar 1 tsp pure vanilla extract Grease an 8x8 inch square pan and set aside. Combine the sugars, butter, heavy cream treacle and cream of tartar in a medium saucepan. Cook over medium high heat, stirring constantly, until the butter is melted and the ingredients are combined. Was down the sides of the pot with a pastry brush dipped in hot water if sugar crystals form on the sides, to prevent recrystallization. Clip a candy thermometer to the side of the pot and continue to cook without stirring until the mixture reaches 240 degrees on the candy thermometer. Remove the pan from the heat and stir in the vanilla. Allow the bubbles to subside and the mixture to cool slightly, about 5 minutes. Remove the thermometer and beat or stir vigorously with a wooden spoon until the mixture loses its gloss and is very thick, 15 to 20 minutes. Scrape the mixture into the prepared pan and smooth the top. You  can use a piece of plastic wrap and the palm of your hand to do it. Cool completely before cutting into 1-inch squares. Makes 64 pieces I cannot wait to get to see these treats in the Honeydukes Shop - but while I wait and plan my next vacation, I will definitely make more treats from The Unofficial Harry Potter Cookbook! For more reviews visit A Flurry of Ponderings

  18. 5 out of 5

    Shira

    I especially love the second paragraph of the forward on page xi, where the author points out Harry's need for a sense of kinship and family. After spending fewer than 10 minutes with this book, thank you Liz, I realize that I must get my own copy try all these recipes and share them with friends while watching Harry Potter preferably!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    I loved reading about all the amazing foods in the Harry Potter series – both real and imagined. Since most of the real foods are based on UK-based dishes, I was just as happy to read about them (pasties, trifles, puddings and pies) as I was to dream about JK Rowling’s fictional foods (Butterbeer, chocolate frogs and rock cakes). The cookbook is a hardcover with a beautiful, purple cover. The pages are also 'antiqued' and give the entire thing an old 'magic book' feel. I was a little (okay, a lot) I loved reading about all the amazing foods in the Harry Potter series – both real and imagined. Since most of the real foods are based on UK-based dishes, I was just as happy to read about them (pasties, trifles, puddings and pies) as I was to dream about JK Rowling’s fictional foods (Butterbeer, chocolate frogs and rock cakes). The cookbook is a hardcover with a beautiful, purple cover. The pages are also 'antiqued' and give the entire thing an old 'magic book' feel. I was a little (okay, a lot) disappointed to open up the book and find NO PHOTOS. Not a single one. I had been looking forward to seeing all the beautiful creations I've imagined actually come to life, but unfortunately, that wasn't to be. With over 150 recipes, there are lots of great dishes to try, both Harry Potter inspired (ie. rock cakes) and traditional UK recipes (ie. steak & kidney pie). There are also lots of fun trivia notes and facts throughout the book – some are Harry Potter related, while others discuss historical info about the dishes. All these little tidbits really appealed to the food geek in me. Whenever a recipe is directly linked to the Harry Potter books, there is always a fun reference and story in that recipe's intro. There are lots of interesting facts and fun trivia that will appeal to any Harry Potter fan. The recipes are clearly laid out and easy to read, however, I was a little annoyed with all the word breaks and hyphens. As a writer, I prefer keeping a word together and moving it to the next line rather than constantly using hyphens and breaking up words that fall at the end of the line. Just a little quirk of mine. With the beautiful cover and fun 'antiqued' pages, this is a great book to look at and have on your shelf. Add in the fun recipes, including so many traditional UK recipes, and it's not a bad little cookbook to use either. But there are a few areas where I feel this book fails: 1. No photos. Considering how much effort the author put into re-creating the Harry Potter world in food, it would have been fantastic to see the actual dishes. The lack of photos pretty much makes any cookbook a disappointment for me. 2. With over 150 recipes, you’d think I'd be happy. But I'm not. Because this cookbook lacks the one recipe that any Harry Potter cookbook should absolutely require – Butterbeer. In the forward to this cookbook, George Beahm, says "I raise my foaming mug of butterbeer – the most frequently mentioned beverage in the Harry Potter novels..." . Yet, there is no recipe for Butterbeer in the book! If you're a fan of Harry Potter, than you'll know how tragic this omission is. 3. A couple of recipes were actually included that the author admitted had not tested at all. What? How do you include a recipe in a cookbook that hasn't been tested (at least several times) to ensure it works? So, while this is the best Harry Potter cookbook out of all the ones I've seen in bookstores, it still isn't as good as it could be. Die-hard Harry Potter should still consider adding this to their bookshelves...just don’t expect to settle down with a mug of Butterbeer when you read it.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jillyn

    I love Harry Potter. I love food. I love the food from Harry Potter. Reading about treats like butterbeer and treacle tarts used to make me want to be a witch just so I could enjoy them. I thought this book and I would get along great. Unfortunately, this cookbook is mediocre at best. I will first make the same complaint everyone else is making: there's no pictures. Not one. There's 150 recipes of delicious sounding things, and not a picture among them. It was pretty disappointing. It starts with I love Harry Potter. I love food. I love the food from Harry Potter. Reading about treats like butterbeer and treacle tarts used to make me want to be a witch just so I could enjoy them. I thought this book and I would get along great. Unfortunately, this cookbook is mediocre at best. I will first make the same complaint everyone else is making: there's no pictures. Not one. There's 150 recipes of delicious sounding things, and not a picture among them. It was pretty disappointing. It starts with a nice introduction and has some helpful hints. I did like the way it was divided, which was by location. That way you could look specifically for food from Hogwarts or at the Weasleys'. The steps are numbered, and the recipes are peppered with hints and fun historical facts, as well as guides for making substitutions, which I appreciated. I also liked that each recipe came with a paragraph explaining which book and chapter the recipe was from, along with some context. One thing that bugged me about this is that there's a stress on having both kid and adult versions of recipes like fruitcake. I don't understand why this is. The alcohol cooks out.... It isn't necessary to remove alcohol before serving it to minors. It's for flavor, not to get drunk. It's a cake. I also really didn't appreciate that some of these recipes haven't even been tested by the author: and she admits it in the text. If you didn't want to make it, why the hell would I want to? In a similar vein, some of these recipes were kind of lazy. Bacon and eggs is two separate recipes in this book; one for bacon, and one for eggs.... Really? Also, one of the recipes point blank says that candied orange peel is impossible to find, so she just omitted it and used marmalade. First, this is a cookbook- make them yourself. Second, why would you admit that? Just don't put that note in at all, and no one would think twice about it. And yet another thing that I have seen in a lot of reviews: there's no butterbeer. Not even a butterbeer inspired cake or anything. It's just gone. How can you overlook the most popular treat in the HP universe? No firewhiskey either, but that's splitting hairs. Despite the copious amount of issues I had with this, there are still some dishes that I would really like to try. Some of them include Christmas Pudding Ice Cream, No Bake Chocolate-Bottom Pumpkin Tart, and Almond-Ginger-Peach Treacle Tart. All in all, I'd recommend this for really, really new cooks and maybe kids. But as an adult, I don't really need recipes for a lot of these things. I'll hang on to it purely for the Harry Potter theme, but probably won't use it much. This review can also be found on my blog, Bitches n Prose.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Carrie

    I received this book as a gift and while I thought it would be entertaining (as I enjoy all things HP), I was truly impressed by the quality of the book overall. For each recipe included in the book there is a summary of the reference within the HP books, a origin of the dish overall and whether it is still popular in the UK, how to make the recipe more adult or child friendly and tips to make the recipes with alternative ingredients for US cooks without access to some UK products. The book had I received this book as a gift and while I thought it would be entertaining (as I enjoy all things HP), I was truly impressed by the quality of the book overall. For each recipe included in the book there is a summary of the reference within the HP books, a origin of the dish overall and whether it is still popular in the UK, how to make the recipe more adult or child friendly and tips to make the recipes with alternative ingredients for US cooks without access to some UK products. The book had an impressive range and covered many of the HP specific items (pumpkin juice, butterbeer, etc.) but also included recipes that are just more well known in the UK (treacle tart, kippers, bangers & mash, steak & kidney pudding) and classic dishes that are served at Hogwarts (beef stew, chicken & ham pie, roast beef, mashed potatoes). Although I am a picky eater, I loved reading about all the dishes and getting an explanation for some of the more classic british dishes I have never seen in the US! It was also fun to have an actual recipe for the dishes you always hear about but that modern cookbooks have revised too much (such as old fashioned chocolate cake or roasted potatoes). Not to get lost in the actual cooking, the author did a great job at making sure everything was related to HP and included chapters on food made at the Dursley's, at Diagon Alley, from the Hogwarts Express, from Hagrid, Kreature & Mrs. Weasley, and from Hogsmeade. In addition, understanding the food more helped me picture some of the scenes from the books in more vivid (and accurate) detail. I would recommend this book to any HP fan and even those interested in classic British meals.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Aja: The Narcoleptic Ninja

    I found this cookbook to be pretty underwhelming. Firstly, the selection of recipes is pretty odd. Like in the very beginning of book 1, the Dursleys don't get Harry ice cream at the zoo, the attendant notices and out of pure shame they get him a lemon pop. I don't think anyone read "lemon pop" and decided they NEEDED the recipe for that, but it's here! And that's not all, there's a LOT of other ice cream recipes, including Dudley's double chocolate ice cream cone...really? There's also a recipe I found this cookbook to be pretty underwhelming. Firstly, the selection of recipes is pretty odd. Like in the very beginning of book 1, the Dursleys don't get Harry ice cream at the zoo, the attendant notices and out of pure shame they get him a lemon pop. I don't think anyone read "lemon pop" and decided they NEEDED the recipe for that, but it's here! And that's not all, there's a LOT of other ice cream recipes, including Dudley's double chocolate ice cream cone...really? There's also a recipe for bacon and eggs, a recipe to make a proper cup of tea, a recipe for KETCHUP, and so much more "I really need to fill up some pages" recipes. Onto some of the actual Harry Potter recipes- there's a reason this is an unofficial cookbook. Most surprising (and honestly disappointing) cauldron cakes are pancakes. Just pancakes. Sugar mice are literally just fondant. Overall, there might be a few recipes in here I'd try, but most of them did not feel like Harry Potter recipes.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lamadia

    This is chock full of traditional British recipes. I haven't had a chance to try them out, but I'm so excited to have a Shepherd's Pie recipe along with some other classics. If it was mentioned in the books, it's in the cookbook. Unlike other tie-in cookbooks that aim for inventive recipes where the end result looks like something from the movie or something like that, this is mostly recipes for the real classic British foods that are mentioned in the story (there's a lot of feasting that goes o This is chock full of traditional British recipes. I haven't had a chance to try them out, but I'm so excited to have a Shepherd's Pie recipe along with some other classics. If it was mentioned in the books, it's in the cookbook. Unlike other tie-in cookbooks that aim for inventive recipes where the end result looks like something from the movie or something like that, this is mostly recipes for the real classic British foods that are mentioned in the story (there's a lot of feasting that goes on at Hogwarts). These are recipes that you can use for every day meals and not just for a viewing party.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lucy (LucyinBooktopia)

    I liked the book very much even though I think that it's a shame there isn't a recipe of Butterbeer

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ally

    A great tie in, with all my favorite recipes... but where was butterbeer???

  26. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    The little clips & stories about these recipes are actually really neat!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    I have made a few recipes and I love this book!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Bookworm

    First and foremost, I am a Potterhead so when I saw this cookbook available on AmazonVine, I had to request it. When the Harry Potter books finally came to an end, I loved the series so much, I read all seven books all over again. I ran the gamut of emotions while reading these beloved books, I laughed, I cried.... I developed a crush on Professor Snape. Hogwarts is the literary place I'd most like to visit. (Go Slytherin) I'd want to drink Butterbeer and eat treats from Honedukes candy shop. Wh First and foremost, I am a Potterhead so when I saw this cookbook available on AmazonVine, I had to request it. When the Harry Potter books finally came to an end, I loved the series so much, I read all seven books all over again. I ran the gamut of emotions while reading these beloved books, I laughed, I cried.... I developed a crush on Professor Snape. Hogwarts is the literary place I'd most like to visit. (Go Slytherin) I'd want to drink Butterbeer and eat treats from Honedukes candy shop. What better than a Harry Potter inspired cookbook for my shelves? I found it nice that with each recipe, the author includes a quick description and tells us which Harry Potter book the recipe is from. She also gives a background of the origins of the foods or on what Americans might call the dish versus what those in England refer to it. I found all this to be a nice touch. My one qualm about this cookbook is that there are no photos or diagrams for reference. I like to bake and cook and I enjoy trying out new recipes, but I need a photo of some sort to go by. As soon as I opened this cookbook, I instantly noticed there were no photos, and that was a real letdown. I thought this cookbook was aimed at a younger audience, which again brings me to the pictures issue. As soon as my daughter saw my copy, she asked me if we could make something. The recipes are varied, some are easy, some more difficult and I think photos would help greatly. There are simple recipes like Sugar Biscuits, Hot Chocolate, English Tomato Ketchup and Queen Victoria's Soup, which I can imagine kids would enjoy making with parental supervision. Then there's the more complex recipes for the ambitious like Bouillabaisse, Chocolate Eclairs, and Haggis, which calls for sheep's lung, heart and liver, that I can't imagine children wanting to cook (or eat) but that depends on what is customary to them. I made the Big Fluffy Pancakes with my daughter. The recipe was simple to follow, the ingredients were all things I already had at home. I was surprised to see the juice of one lemon is added to the mix, and it's a nice touch. The pancakes were yummy. "In the wizarding world this dish is called Cauldron Cakes. Harry sees them for the first time on the witch's trolley on board the Hogwarts Express in Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone. He generously shares with Ron, who finds his dry corned beef sandwich unappealing." p.41, The Unofficial Harry Potter Cookbook The chapters have cute names like Good Food with Bad Relatives and Treats from the Train. I think this cookbook makes for a nice gift or collectors item for any Potterhead. While the novelty appeal is great, the execution could have been better. **I am an amazon affiliate and received this book from AmazonVine. This review is my honest opinion. I did not receive any type of compensation for reading and reviewing this book. While I receive free books from publishers and authors, I am under no obligation to write a positive review.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Adalira Morningstar

    Clearly the biggest example of magic is how everyone at Hogwarts isn't 500 pounds.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Anna Nesterovich

    Review in progress, each newly tried recipe will be rated separately. p. 3 - 3 stars - English Fried Eggs and a Gammon of Bacon - Eggs and bacon, yay! I'm not sure though I'd need a recipe. p. 12 - 4 stars - Petunia's Pudding (English Strawberry Trifle) - That was my birthday cake, and one of the best at that. p. 14 - 4 stars - Lemon Meringue Pie - A complicated process, but a very good result. I only wish I did in winter rather than summer. I'm not sure I can call it weeping, but this humidity mad Review in progress, each newly tried recipe will be rated separately. p. 3 - 3 stars - English Fried Eggs and a Gammon of Bacon - Eggs and bacon, yay! I'm not sure though I'd need a recipe. p. 12 - 4 stars - Petunia's Pudding (English Strawberry Trifle) - That was my birthday cake, and one of the best at that. p. 14 - 4 stars - Lemon Meringue Pie - A complicated process, but a very good result. I only wish I did in winter rather than summer. I'm not sure I can call it weeping, but this humidity made the pie sweat for sure. p. 32 - 3 stars - Crumpets - An ok food, but too much trouble for something unassuming. p. 33 - 5 stars - Chocolate Pudding, no-bake version - That was a wonderful pudding! Easy, quick, and tasty! I used tapioca starch instead of cornstarch, but other than that the recipe doesn't need any modifications. p. 36 - 2 stars - Tea: How to Make a Proper Cuppa - Really? And it's not even the best way to make tea. p. 50 - exempt - Roast Pheasant - Where do i get a pheasant? p. 77 - 2 stars - Oversized Blueberry Muffins with Crunchy Tops - a very good idea, easy to make, BUT the recipe calls for 2 teaspoons of baking soda. I shrugged and put them in, but it's way to much; had to throw away the muffins, because they not only tasted of soda, they were literally bitter from it. p. 157 - exempt - Black Pudding - No blood on sale here in Iowa. p. 182 - 5 stars - Banana Fritters with Caramel Sauce - I want them everyday! p. 197 - 5 stars - Meringues - That's how I make my meringues now.

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