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More-With-Less Cookbook

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When first published in 1976, More-with-Less Cookbook by Doris Janzen Longacre struck a nerve with its call for every household to help solve the world food crisis. Now with more than 850,000 copies around the globe, it has become the favorite cookbook of many families. Full of recipes from hundreds of contributors, More-with-Less Cookbook offers suggestions "on how to eat When first published in 1976, More-with-Less Cookbook by Doris Janzen Longacre struck a nerve with its call for every household to help solve the world food crisis. Now with more than 850,000 copies around the globe, it has become the favorite cookbook of many families. Full of recipes from hundreds of contributors, More-with-Less Cookbook offers suggestions "on how to eat better and consume less of the world's limited food resources." While not including new recipes, this most recent printing does include a new introduction and updated statistics with food costs and nutritional information for today's generations.


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When first published in 1976, More-with-Less Cookbook by Doris Janzen Longacre struck a nerve with its call for every household to help solve the world food crisis. Now with more than 850,000 copies around the globe, it has become the favorite cookbook of many families. Full of recipes from hundreds of contributors, More-with-Less Cookbook offers suggestions "on how to eat When first published in 1976, More-with-Less Cookbook by Doris Janzen Longacre struck a nerve with its call for every household to help solve the world food crisis. Now with more than 850,000 copies around the globe, it has become the favorite cookbook of many families. Full of recipes from hundreds of contributors, More-with-Less Cookbook offers suggestions "on how to eat better and consume less of the world's limited food resources." While not including new recipes, this most recent printing does include a new introduction and updated statistics with food costs and nutritional information for today's generations.

30 review for More-With-Less Cookbook

  1. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I have been really fed-up with cookbooks lately - they have these beautiful, lavish recipes... but they all call for half a million fancy ingredients that cost a LOT and are hard to find in a small town with no easy access to gourmet grocery stores. So when I saw this book and read a little about it, I wanted it. "More-with-Less" sounds like code for "Simple" to me. So I went into this prepared for the simple ingredients and back-to-basics cooking... and that's what I got! I love that most (all?) I have been really fed-up with cookbooks lately - they have these beautiful, lavish recipes... but they all call for half a million fancy ingredients that cost a LOT and are hard to find in a small town with no easy access to gourmet grocery stores. So when I saw this book and read a little about it, I wanted it. "More-with-Less" sounds like code for "Simple" to me. So I went into this prepared for the simple ingredients and back-to-basics cooking... and that's what I got! I love that most (all?) of the ingredients the recipes call for can be found at my local market or grocery store. And they cook with whole grains and natural ingredients, which is a direction I am moving towards. I just baked the oatmeal muffins, and even though I overworked the dough, they came out really delicious and were as simple as the recipe said they would be, and made only 12 - which is perfect since I cook for just me. All with ingredients I already had! (I do have one note: they are big proponents of dry milk, which I will never get behind. Just move past things like that.) What I didn't expect was that the greatest value of this book isn't necessarily in the recipes - it's in the philosophy. This COOKbook is actually about 1/4 to 1/3 BOOK, and Mennonite philosophy just oozes out of it. For me, it put a name to the thoughts I was already having about American consumption. It was a little hard to follow and connect-the-dots... but that's good, because it made me truly think about it. It actually made me do a little research on Mennonite beliefs... I recommend this highly to anyone concerned with food - the world's food resources, eating healthier, saving money on food, the evils of the American food industry, etc. As a Christian, the message of mission and compassion appeals to me, so I can't speak to how non-Christians would take it - but I do think you can get past it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Shelby *trains flying monkeys*

    One of my favorite cookbooks of all time. I kept the library copy until I thought they were going to come to my house and take it back. I finally have my own copy :)

  3. 5 out of 5

    LeAnne

    The copyright on my copy of More with Less Cookbook is 1976 so I probably didn’t take it to Ethiopia with me that year. But I may have heard of it there where we worked with Mennonite missionaries at the Good Shepherd School. (It was the Mennonites who produced the book.) Ethiopia would certainly have introduced me to the need to do more with less. Not only was poverty all around me, but grocery stores were very limited. More with Less became my staple cookbook somewhere in the next few years be The copyright on my copy of More with Less Cookbook is 1976 so I probably didn’t take it to Ethiopia with me that year. But I may have heard of it there where we worked with Mennonite missionaries at the Good Shepherd School. (It was the Mennonites who produced the book.) Ethiopia would certainly have introduced me to the need to do more with less. Not only was poverty all around me, but grocery stores were very limited. More with Less became my staple cookbook somewhere in the next few years between Brazil and Mozambique. It never asked me for a box of this or a can of that that wasn’t available where I lived. A side note told me I could add molasses to white sugar to get a tasty brown sugar equivalent when sugar-rich Brazil thought it was too sophisticated for the brown stuff. In those days molasses was sold for a pittance in a five-gallon pail since its primary use as a by-product of sugar production was to tar roads! (Near the end of our term I threw out my half-used pail when it fermented, but by then the Seventh-Day Adventists had started marketing molasses in the supermarket. Only in 1985 did I find brown sugar in the store, again complements of the health-conscious SDA.) The concept of More with Less is sustainable eating for the whole world, not conspicuous consumption by a few. More nutrition, more delight in good foods, with less consumption of limited resources—low-cost, low-fat, low-sugar with less expensive protein sources. The book emphasizes avoiding corn-fed beef and heavily processed foods and relies on complementary vegetable proteins used in Asia, African and Latin American cooking. The Indian dahl recipe garnished with a variety of chopped fruits, vegetables, and nuts became a family favourite. In Mozambique where we shared a kitchen without an oven for the first several months and store-bought bread was low quality, I turned to the flour tortilla recipe in More with Less and we regularly ate tacos stuffed with beans and vegetables instead of meat, which was also rarely available. Stir-fried green beans and the Crusty Mexican Bean Bake are recipes I still turn to frequently. (Well, not frequently enough, my husband would probably say.) The back cover is off my old copy, but I didn’t throw it away because it includes a useful table of conversions and substitutions. Pages are yellowed and sometimes stained. Margins contain notes on variations and alternate recipes. As I flip through the pages, I find forgotten recipes I would still like to try. It isn’t so much that I use this cookbook on a daily basis anymore—after forty years, I have a pretty established repertoire for daily use—but it formed my philosophy of eating and cooking. Basic ingredients, balanced nutrition, smaller portions served with delight. I can’t solve the world’s food distribution problems, but I can avoid contributing to it. I can celebrate God’s gifts without abusing them or my body. Why am I telling you all this? Harvest House is coming out with a fortieth anniversary edition of More with Less. A warm feeling of nostalgia poured over me when I saw the ad. Will a new generation rethink their eating habits and other consumer habits as a result of shared recipes? This generation is much more open to cooking from scratch, much more aware of the potential dangers of food additives. But we are divided between devotees and those who roll their eyes. The philosophy of More with Less is based on the gospel, a commitment to the stewardship of God’s creation and living out Christ’s compassion for the world.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Connie

    I have an earlier, spiral-bound edition of this book that I purchased over ten years ago. At the time, I was a stay-at-home mom and our financial situation wasn't the best. The book was a big help to me because it presented scrumptious, healthy recipes that fit into our budget. I was thrilled when I saw a new-updated edition on Netgalley and couldn't wait to look through it. I wanted to see what changes they had made. This book was first published in 1976, and yet it fits in so well with the inf I have an earlier, spiral-bound edition of this book that I purchased over ten years ago. At the time, I was a stay-at-home mom and our financial situation wasn't the best. The book was a big help to me because it presented scrumptious, healthy recipes that fit into our budget. I was thrilled when I saw a new-updated edition on Netgalley and couldn't wait to look through it. I wanted to see what changes they had made. This book was first published in 1976, and yet it fits in so well with the information about food choices that is always coming out. The author, a socially, conscious Mennonite, was concerned about eating healthier, wasting food and using up less of our worlds resources. The book contains recipes for your meatless Mondays and even ideas of what to do with leftovers. You can probably shave quite a bit of money off your food budget, if you are using up what is in your fridge instead of routinely throwing everything away. This is a book that you will use for as long as you cook. And hopefully then pass it on to your child. I highly recommend it. Your purchase also benefits Mennonite Central Committee, a worldwide ministry of relief, development, and peacebuilding. That's another good reason to buy a copy.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Martha

    This is more than a cookbook, but a book on the culture of nutrition and doing more with less in our families eating habits. The gentle simplicity of the recipes had me realizing that I could enjoy cooking again, without concentrating on complicated ingredients or recipes. This book was written before most of the allergy craze, and it shows all the more clearly how it is become more of a fad than a need. I am aware of many true allergies to food, but also see how in our country, it has become a This is more than a cookbook, but a book on the culture of nutrition and doing more with less in our families eating habits. The gentle simplicity of the recipes had me realizing that I could enjoy cooking again, without concentrating on complicated ingredients or recipes. This book was written before most of the allergy craze, and it shows all the more clearly how it is become more of a fad than a need. I am aware of many true allergies to food, but also see how in our country, it has become a first world need to have so many varied and different food "needs". I found myself fascinated how many things have changed, but at the same time, the needs and focus needs to remain the same. If we can be satisfied with simple food, even for hosting gatherings, it could be much more simple. Some of my favorites from this book still are the Coconut Custard pie, ethnic recipes, and granola.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kristin

    Longacre was clearly a woman ahead of her time. Her philosophy is reminiscent of Bittman and Pollan, but this book was published decades before theirs. Some of the nutritional information is now known to be incorrect, but overall it is pretty sound. The first part of the book goes into great detail about her whole foods philosophy and includes nutritional and environmental reasons for her choices. While the recipes do contain some cringe-worthy ingredients like margarine, shortening, and sugar t Longacre was clearly a woman ahead of her time. Her philosophy is reminiscent of Bittman and Pollan, but this book was published decades before theirs. Some of the nutritional information is now known to be incorrect, but overall it is pretty sound. The first part of the book goes into great detail about her whole foods philosophy and includes nutritional and environmental reasons for her choices. While the recipes do contain some cringe-worthy ingredients like margarine, shortening, and sugar the emphasis is heavy on whole foods and anyone with a modicum of cooking experience will have no trouble making substitutions in the vast majority of recipes.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    While I won't be slaughtering my own chickens or converting to powdered milk anytime soon, there are quite a few recipes in this book that I am excited to try. Not only does it serve as a gentle reminder about which foods and shopping methods are easiest on the environment, it is a wonderful celebration of fellowship and community through shared cooking and meals. Even the margins are crammed with lovely quotes, many of them from 'ordinary' people who contributed to the book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Not too much to say, the first few chapters were really interesting, the rest is recipes. I liked what the author had to say about what we eat, why, and also just thinking about the whole picture of food. I liked the scriptures mentioned, and I appreciate that the author believes stewardship extends to the food system.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Colette!

    1) A cookbook that embraces fresh vegetables! Lentils! Beans! And they're not side dishes! 2) I would consider becoming a Mennonite for this book alone.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Gaele

    Who doesn’t have an eye to budget conscious, healthy and delicious food? And, best of all you can have new options, beyond leftovers, that don’t mean you have to get out and buy bunches of meats, spices, etc.. From some simple (and tasty) salad dressing recipes that are easy, tasty and quick to make to desserts that are heavy on flavor, shorter on time and effort than many. There’s no reinventing the wheel here – these are simple foods, prepared carefully and with a mindfulness that keeps wasted Who doesn’t have an eye to budget conscious, healthy and delicious food? And, best of all you can have new options, beyond leftovers, that don’t mean you have to get out and buy bunches of meats, spices, etc.. From some simple (and tasty) salad dressing recipes that are easy, tasty and quick to make to desserts that are heavy on flavor, shorter on time and effort than many. There’s no reinventing the wheel here – these are simple foods, prepared carefully and with a mindfulness that keeps wasted items to a minimum. Everyone (I’m sure) has seen recipes for granola and granola bars – you can quickly (and cost-effectively) make your own granola and bars for snacks, breakfast or toppings. (I like the granola with yoghurt and fresh berries, or warmed like a porridge with milk. Best of all, this cookbook has recipes that are simple and easy, with suggestions for leftovers, ways to make ingredients stretch without losing taste, and easy to recreate, bringing full of flavor options to replace some of your pre-made or more expansive and expensive recipes. I received an eArc copy of the title from the publisher via NetGalley for purpose of honest review. I was not compensated for this review: all conclusions are my own responsibility.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ann Rahfeldt

    Back in the 80's this cook book was my bible. Not only were the recipes very usable; the attitude toward food was something I adapted as my own. I am so glad that this book was printed.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Janis Hill

    New disclaimer due to new Amazon rules: I was gifted a free electronic copy of this book by Herald Press, via Netgalley. I am not being forced to post a review; I am doing it of my own free will as I enjoy reviewing. On advice from Amazon, and based on their emailed reply – “My review is voluntarily and the Author/publisher does not require a review in exchange or attempt to influence my review.” My review: Although this is a reprint of an older book, this is the first time I have read a copy, and New disclaimer due to new Amazon rules: I was gifted a free electronic copy of this book by Herald Press, via Netgalley. I am not being forced to post a review; I am doing it of my own free will as I enjoy reviewing. On advice from Amazon, and based on their emailed reply – “My review is voluntarily and the Author/publisher does not require a review in exchange or attempt to influence my review.” My review: Although this is a reprint of an older book, this is the first time I have read a copy, and so my review is purely based on this edition of the book. What can I say... It's okay, but not exactly my thing. I mean, it ticks all the right boxes by being recipes that use whole foods, nothing fancy or expensive, and nice and simple recipes... It’s possibly a good guide to someone new to cooking? But for me, it was still missing something. I mean, there is a difference with cooking flavourful foods on a budget, and just relying on masses of cheap strong in flavour ingredients like onion and garlic to provide the flavour for the entire meal. I know this is a bias of mine, due to my allium intolerance, but I have no time for recipes that rely solely on allium to make a meal. Then there is the heavy Christian influence. Another bias by not being a Christian I guess! There is nothing wrong with other people's religions and faiths... But I am yet to see the point in them being rammed down my throat in a main stream cook book. Harsh of me, I know. Especially as the cover of this book does warn you it is a book created by a Christian faith and so it more likely than not going to contain religious banter. The book is also obviously for an American audience as the measurements are all in imperial and not metric. This isn’t a big deal to a seasoned cook… but may stump a few newbie cooks who work in metric, until they find themselves a good online conversion table to help them out. All in all, it was a good starter book for someone who is new to cooking, can tolerate loads of allium (they’re going to have to with this book) and is okay with Christian banter in amongst their recipes. But I am not the right reader for any of that and so I was wrong for the book. Not the other way around, please realise that. I believe this book to be good, written and shared in the best intentions and I hope it helps many a new cook out there. This old cook and obviously grumpy old Pagan just isn’t the right reader. :-) Would I recommend this book to others? That is a really hard call as this wasn’t a book for me, but it did have a lot of good points. I guess I would say if you want a simple, budget friendly cook book and can cope with the beliefs of those who wrote it – go for it. Check this book out today. If recommending to my close friends? I just wouldn’t. There are much better cooking whole foods on a budget books out there in my opinion. Would I buy this book for myself? I think everyone has already guessed the answer to this one! ;-) No, I wouldn’t. But don’t get me wrong, there are a few recipes in there I wouldn’t mind trying… but that is like a few half dozen in a book of hundreds of recipes and I don’t keep cook books I can only cook a few items from. Those are the books I borrow, copy the recipes out of (referencing them appropriately) and then return to the library. In summary: A basic, budget friendly cook book, but not one for me.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Betty

    Years ago, I bought the original More-with-Less, but many moves and many years resulted in a missing copy. I don’t remember if I made any of the recipes, but I do remember enjoying perusing the book. I was happy to receive a PDF copy of the book published by Herald Press and received through NetGalley. More-with-Less Cookbook was never just a cookbook. It was and is a roadmap into how to view and react to food and the world. Just how much do we need in order to live? When does having enough chang Years ago, I bought the original More-with-Less, but many moves and many years resulted in a missing copy. I don’t remember if I made any of the recipes, but I do remember enjoying perusing the book. I was happy to receive a PDF copy of the book published by Herald Press and received through NetGalley. More-with-Less Cookbook was never just a cookbook. It was and is a roadmap into how to view and react to food and the world. Just how much do we need in order to live? When does having enough change to wanting too much? What should be done to even out the resources available in the world? These questions and more are addressed in Part I of the book. The answers are there also. Part II is the recipes and there are lots. Some are simple like Brown Gravy (meat drippings, flour, sugar, salt and pepper). Others are more challenging such as Fried Squash Blossoms. In that case, the challenge might be finding the squash blossoms. Features such as “gather up the fragments” are filled with ways to use parts of foods that might otherwise be thrown away. Maybe “my” idea for freezing those bits of leftover corn and green beans and using them to make soups and stews actually came from my lost copy. Recipes that are vegetarian and gluten free are marked. In some cases, the history behind a particular dish is explained like Fruit Moos. And no, there are no cows (moos) involved. I would highly recommend More-with-Less Cookbook, 40th Anniversary Edition to anyone who cares about food, the deliciousness of food, the waste of food and the impact how we use food affects others. I received a free copy of the book from NetGalley in exchanged for my honest review. Thank you.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lili

    From Netgalley for a review: Usually if I run into a cookbook who has strong spiritual tones I am able to overlook it in favor of the recipes, assuming the recipes are good. I thought with the title 'More with Less' it would be focused on making things with few ingredients, hearty stews and the like, and while there is some of that, really it was just rehashing things I have seen many other places. There was nothing new and exciting, so as a cookbook it failed for me, though I could see someone w From Netgalley for a review: Usually if I run into a cookbook who has strong spiritual tones I am able to overlook it in favor of the recipes, assuming the recipes are good. I thought with the title 'More with Less' it would be focused on making things with few ingredients, hearty stews and the like, and while there is some of that, really it was just rehashing things I have seen many other places. There was nothing new and exciting, so as a cookbook it failed for me, though I could see someone who is just setting up a cookbook collection finding this useful. Granted this is the 40th anniversary reprinting so maybe it was groundbreaking when it came out, but referencing my other older cookbooks from the time does not lead me to think so. I did find this book to be unbelievably self aggrandizing and preachy, so confident that the message it is sending is the correct one that it seemed to miss the whole point of tone. I agree with a lot of the message of this book, food is a sacred thing (I come at it from a different form of spirituality, but the bare bones of the idea are the same) eat healthy, take care of the environment and such...these are good messages, but the tone of the messages left a sour taste in my mouth.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ivonne Rovira

    A Mennonite introduced me to More-With-Less: A World Community Cookbook 20 years ago or more. First published in 1976, this cookbook authored by a socially conscious Mennonite, is being reissued this year. It’s hard to fathom that ideas that are now a cornerstone of healthy eating — avoid processed food, eat less meat in order to create a healthier planet and more sustainable agriculture in lesser-developed countries, sample ethnic cuisines, you can eat better and more cheaply, we can change th A Mennonite introduced me to More-With-Less: A World Community Cookbook 20 years ago or more. First published in 1976, this cookbook authored by a socially conscious Mennonite, is being reissued this year. It’s hard to fathom that ideas that are now a cornerstone of healthy eating — avoid processed food, eat less meat in order to create a healthier planet and more sustainable agriculture in lesser-developed countries, sample ethnic cuisines, you can eat better and more cheaply, we can change the world with our food purchases — were once revolutionary ideas. And it was More-With-Less’s late author, Doris Janzen Longacre, who helped make them mainstream. The cookbook has been updated in its 40th anniversary edition, and, having lost that long-ago copy, and I’m very happy to have it back. It’s a welcome addition for any cook who realizes that, when we get more with less, others can have more. Delicious food and a chance to make a difference for the planet and its people. Who could ask for anything more? In the interest of full disclosure, I received this book from NetGalley and Herald Press in exchange for an honest review.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Malou

    This is my first cookbook that I have received on my Kindle and I am a little bit disappointed. It doesn't seem to be at all accommodating for Kindle as I cant skip ahead chapters or go to a certain page to look at recipes. Now this could have something to do with my older Kindle version rather than the book. There aren't a table of contents for the actual recipes but they have been bunched in groups like: "main dishes" or: "vegetables". This makes it seem less interesting to me, knowing I cant This is my first cookbook that I have received on my Kindle and I am a little bit disappointed. It doesn't seem to be at all accommodating for Kindle as I cant skip ahead chapters or go to a certain page to look at recipes. Now this could have something to do with my older Kindle version rather than the book. There aren't a table of contents for the actual recipes but they have been bunched in groups like: "main dishes" or: "vegetables". This makes it seem less interesting to me, knowing I cant find that specific thing on that specific page at that specific time. I already eat kind of simple food, being vegetarian and a shit cook, so nothing stood out to me as new. It didn't mention that it was a Christian undertone in the description of the book. Although I think it doesn't matter where a good message comes from, I am an Atheist, and I would have liked to know in advance that I would be urged to read the bible for good food tips. It was just not for me but in the right hands it can no doubt do wonders.

  17. 4 out of 5

    feathers

    i will probably never be on board with the powdered milk gospel (um) advocated here, but the politics and perspective framing this cookbook are right on. encouraging experimentation, substitution, community, and an ecologically-light-footed (right?) culinary aesthetics, these recipes are great for dumpstered deliciousness !

  18. 5 out of 5

    Anne White

    A very attractive updated look, combined with the old favourite recipes, makes this one a winner.

  19. 5 out of 5

    DelAnne Frazee

    Title: More-with-Less Cookbook - 40th Edition Author: Doris Janzen Longacre Publisher: Herald Press Published: 9-27-2016 Pages: 328 Genre: Cooking, Food & Wine Sub-Genre: Cookbooks; Special Diet ISBN: 978-836199642 Reviewed For NetGalley and Herald Press Reviewer: DelAnne Rating: 4.5 Starts Easy to follow abd understand recipes. Some unusual ones such as Campfire Packet Stew, Pinto Bean Bread, Chicken turnovers, Pilgrim's Bread, soap recipes, Navajo Fry Bread and dandilion salad just to name a few. Th Title: More-with-Less Cookbook - 40th Edition Author: Doris Janzen Longacre Publisher: Herald Press Published: 9-27-2016 Pages: 328 Genre: Cooking, Food & Wine Sub-Genre: Cookbooks; Special Diet ISBN: 978-836199642 Reviewed For NetGalley and Herald Press Reviewer: DelAnne Rating: 4.5 Starts Easy to follow abd understand recipes. Some unusual ones such as Campfire Packet Stew, Pinto Bean Bread, Chicken turnovers, Pilgrim's Bread, soap recipes, Navajo Fry Bread and dandilion salad just to name a few. There are chutneys, desserts and side and main dishes. A little something for everyone. Along with conversion charts and nutriional information for creaing healthy meals. My rating of "More-with-Less Cookbook " is 4.5 out of 5 stars. Amazon Link: https://www.amazon.com/dp/083619103X/... B&N Link: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/more... GoodReads Link: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/9... The Reading Room Link: https://www.facebook.com/permalink.ph... Twitter Link: https://twitter.com/DelAnne531/status...

  20. 5 out of 5

    Emily M

    This was such a formative cookbook for me as a teen (my grandma had given my mom a copy) and a new wife (my roommate who is an excellent cook gave it to me as a wedding gift), particularly in learning how to truly cook from scratch and stretch a little bit of meat into a whole meal. Back in those days, we didn't have food blogging, homemaking had yet to make its hip resurgence, and I was the only teacher eating homemade refried beans and rice for lunch in the teacher lounge. I learned a lot of i This was such a formative cookbook for me as a teen (my grandma had given my mom a copy) and a new wife (my roommate who is an excellent cook gave it to me as a wedding gift), particularly in learning how to truly cook from scratch and stretch a little bit of meat into a whole meal. Back in those days, we didn't have food blogging, homemaking had yet to make its hip resurgence, and I was the only teacher eating homemade refried beans and rice for lunch in the teacher lounge. I learned a lot of important skills and values from this cookbook, but I don't regularly reach for it anymore. Partially that is because I have my favorite recipes from it (oatmeal bread, refried beans) memorized, and partially because these dishes are not sexy. They're simple, healthy (sometimes in a very 70's way, recommending margarine and white rice!), have straightforward ingredients that I already have in my pantry, and are hard to mess up. They're probably what I should be fixing more often for the family. But I like trying fancy techniques and quirky ingredients. So while I recommend this to any young people going out on their own and learning to cook for the first time, I don't menu plan out of it anymore.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    I purchased an edition of this book 30 years ago and I loved it. When this edition came out, I was convinced that I would feel the same about it. I do. This book has been filled with recipes used by the Mennonite people. It helps the consumer look at the food that we consume, like whole grains, fruits, vegetables, legumes etc. Preferably, these should come from local sources. To show some of the missions that the Mennonite people serve they include pictures from around the world using local resou I purchased an edition of this book 30 years ago and I loved it. When this edition came out, I was convinced that I would feel the same about it. I do. This book has been filled with recipes used by the Mennonite people. It helps the consumer look at the food that we consume, like whole grains, fruits, vegetables, legumes etc. Preferably, these should come from local sources. To show some of the missions that the Mennonite people serve they include pictures from around the world using local resources. I found the recipes were easy to follow and, unlike so many other cookbooks, do not take forever to create. I enjoyed this version as often as I did the first one I owned. I was given this book by NetGalley and Herald Press in exchange for my honest review.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Anne Wingate

    Super Deluxe Food I checked a copy of this book out of the library. Often I do this, intending to photocopy the few recipes that interest me. It soon became obvious that in this case, considering the cost of paper, ink, and wear and tear on this poor old body of mine, it would make better sense to just buy the book. So I did. This is a later edition than the library version, and although either edition is great, this one contains recipes for foods that were not available for earlier editions. I wou Super Deluxe Food I checked a copy of this book out of the library. Often I do this, intending to photocopy the few recipes that interest me. It soon became obvious that in this case, considering the cost of paper, ink, and wear and tear on this poor old body of mine, it would make better sense to just buy the book. So I did. This is a later edition than the library version, and although either edition is great, this one contains recipes for foods that were not available for earlier editions. I would suggest that you make use of such appliances as Instant Pot and Crockpot. They can save you time and money. Recommended for all cooks, would-be cooks and foodies of all sorts.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Hope

    I really like this cookbook, so much so that I bought it! I originally heard about it from a patron, she said she'd had her copy for close to 40 years and still used it all the time! So I went in search of early copies and found one from the early 70's and one from the early 90's, they are identical! Perfect! So I ordered the original and I'm so glad I did! The recipes are simple and nutritious, most are fairly fast to put together. Best of all they taste GREAT! I'll be using this cookbook for a I really like this cookbook, so much so that I bought it! I originally heard about it from a patron, she said she'd had her copy for close to 40 years and still used it all the time! So I went in search of early copies and found one from the early 70's and one from the early 90's, they are identical! Perfect! So I ordered the original and I'm so glad I did! The recipes are simple and nutritious, most are fairly fast to put together. Best of all they taste GREAT! I'll be using this cookbook for a long time!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Shane Moore

    The most important part of this cookbook is the philosophy and principles laid out in the opening sections. The author argues in a warm and inspiring way for simple and frugal cooking, with occasional indulgences as a special occasion. Reading this book reaffirmed what my parents' taught me (and I'm sure they owned this book) and made me feel more resolved to put more effort into my cooking. Most of the recipes didn’t suit my tastes or capabilities, but that's true of any cookbook. I'll definite The most important part of this cookbook is the philosophy and principles laid out in the opening sections. The author argues in a warm and inspiring way for simple and frugal cooking, with occasional indulgences as a special occasion. Reading this book reaffirmed what my parents' taught me (and I'm sure they owned this book) and made me feel more resolved to put more effort into my cooking. Most of the recipes didn’t suit my tastes or capabilities, but that's true of any cookbook. I'll definitely keep this around as a reference.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Neatia

    This is an excellent read, with an abundance of recipes and plenty of ideas for utilizing leftovers and reducing your waste. The edition I read was definitely outdated by nearly 20 years, but I would be very interested in reading and assessing a more updated version. As it was, the version I read had many useful tables and charts, and even better it cites its sources unlike many other books of the same ilk. Definitely provides both food for thought and food for the body.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Vicki

    Bought this book at a rummage sale for 50 cents. Some Interesting reading and recipes. Can't wait to make all of the delicious sounding recipes over the next few months, then I'll be able to write a better and more accurate review, but sounds like a 4 star at this time. Either way, it's a great book to add to my collection.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Casady

    Recipes are delicious and inexpensive! Love the legumes section. Written from a Mennonite perspective. First part explains Mennonite theology on food and lowering amount of resources used and reducing waste. Then recipes are broken up by type of food.

  28. 4 out of 5

    C.W. Holeman III

    The most important cookbook on my shelf. It's far more than just a list of recipes. The only downside is that there are no pictures, so you can't use it to flip through when you're looking for a visual cue on what to cook.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nick Neaton

    I love this fuckin' book

  30. 4 out of 5

    klagan

    This cookbook has a lot of good tips for eating less meat and cooking economically. I want to try more of its recipes but haven't the time now. I will try to access it again in the future.

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